A Massive “Elk Boneyard” Was Discovered In Idaho, And It Looks Straight Out Of A Movie

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This looks like a scene straight from a sci-fi movie.

We’ve all seen the alien movies where the last few survivors stumble across a massive landfill of human remains, and I feel like that’s simply an unwritten rule to add into these types of movies.

Or that scene from the Lion King when Simba learns about the Elephant Graveyard, the one place he’s not supposed to go (and does anyway and winds up getting his dad killed).

However, for a number of officials with Idaho Fish and Game, this fictional movie scene was practically a reality for them here recently.

According to Northwest Sportsman, the officials stumbled upon a massive pile of remains from what they called an “elk boneyard,” near Lewiston at Craig Mountain.

They discovered at least 15 elk heads, as well as fur, broken legs, and a ton of other bones.

They were led to the location via mortality signal from a radio-collared animal earlier this year, and needless to say, they could’ve never fathomed what they would walk into.

Although they found three more collars, senior wildlife technician Mark Shepard noted that it was incredibly difficult to figure out which limbs belonged to which elk:

“I’m sure some scavenging, but with so many bones, hard to say which ones go to which collar.”

He added that a landslide is most likely the cause of this massive gravesite, as there was a lot of rubble surrounding the elk remains:

“With scree material and boulders up to the size of beach balls, it appeared that at least 15 elk were traversing and side hilling near the top of a ridgeline only to be caught up in a landslide.

Bringing them down almost 1,000 feet over just a distance of 300-400 yards, this group of elk was caught up in rubble and snow ultimately resulting in death.

Natural events such as avalanches and rock slides often occur without being observed and it is generally unknown how these events influence wildlife. This event provides evidence that natural events such as this can influence a wildlife population.

Collars placed on multiple species across the state over the span of months and years, allow Idaho Department of Fish and Game to inform management decisions on preserving, protecting, and perpetuating wildlife for continued use and enjoyment of the public.”

Landslide? UFO experiment?

I think I’ll go with the conspiracy theory… It’s a lot more entertaining.

Yellowstone Visitors Cause Traffic Jam Watching Majestic Bull Elk… Pee On His Own Face

Talk about something you don’t see in my part of the country.

Growing up in South Carolina, I can honestly say I’ve never seen an elk in my 23-years of living. Not one time…

They’re indigenous in North Carolina, but by the 1800s the number of elk in the state was virtually zero. They have since been reintroduced, and right now, an estimated 150-200 elk reside in the state.

But still, they’re pretty hard to find…

I imagine that growing up in a part of the world where you just casually see elk chilling on the side of the road, just minding their own business, the sight of elk my not give you pause, but for most of us, we’re gonna stop and take pictures.

This video comes from Yellowstone National Park, a place where folks travel from thousands of miles away to see elk. Although sometimes, you get a little more than you bargained for.

This group stumbles upon a magnificent creature who lets out a bugle and then proceeds to stand up, and start… PEEING on himself.

The ol’ Elk had been sipping the horny juice, as rutting bulls can sometimes piss on themselves in order to douse themselves in their scent and attract females.

My guy was just getting ready for mating season, and all of these onlookers were getting in the way. Thankfully we had the park ranger hilariously screaming at people to move along.

“Shot at Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park. The ranger soundtrack is great.”

You gotta love Yellowstone though, where else will an elk pissing on his own face cause a traffic jam.

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Elk Hits Moving Car Trying To Escape A Wolf At Yellowstone

Never a dull moment in Yellowstone National Park.

Or Yellowstone the show, but that’s another story…

Spanning across Wyoming, Montana and into Idaho, Yellowstone National Park is home to some of the most incredible wildlife you’ll find anywhere in the United States. We’re talking bears, wolves, elk, deer, bison, pronghorn, as well as a ton of fish, birds, and reptiles.

Established in 1872, it’s the first national park in the United States and widely accepted as the first national park in the world. Some will argue however that Bogd Khan Uul National Park in Mongolia is the oldest.

Oldest or not, if it’s not on your bucket list, you need to put it on there ASAP. No matter when you’re there, you’re pretty much guaranteed to see something incredible.

Whether it’s a bison stampede, a bear chasing an elk, a pack of wolves hunting… the place is just crawling with breathtaking wildlife experiences.

And sometimes, you don’t even have to be looking for it.

Matt Fluke of Idaho Falls, Idaho, was looking for a place to picnic with his family when the car behind him got smoked by an elk. Boom, right into the side of their SUV.

Of course there is nothing special about hitting an elk with your car, just about anybody that’s every heard a country song has a deer a time or two. But this elk wasn’t just crossing the road, it was running for its life.

Yep, right after it slammed into the car and knocked itself out, a black wolf emerged from the trees, just seconds behind it.

“I didn’t look at my dashcam video until I got back to where we were staying at. Originally I thought it happened behind that car. We pulled over for a second and saw the elk on the road and the wolf with it.”

Naturally, they pulled over to watch nature take its course.

Wanna catch an elk? Just chase it into a moving car… chase is over.

“There was a turn out real close and lots of other cars stopping around there. You could see it from where we were at and the car that was behind me pulled over and then pulled out and went down the road… it was wild.”

Wild indeed.

Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Joins Wolf Pack On Elk Hunt, Steals The Kill

Work smarter, not harder.

In the wild, it’s first come first serve, survival of the fittest, only the strong survive, and most critters will go to extreme lengths to make sure they get fed.

But… even in the wild, there’s such as thing as freeloaders, and I’m not talking about scavengers.

One particular grizzly bear at Yellowstone National Park came up with a genius idea to follow along a wolf pack in search of its prey. And no, the grizzly was not there to make friends.

According to The Hill, this grizzly was following the Junction Butte wolf pack as they were in the midst of an elk hunt back in October of 2021. The wolves tracked down an elk, and when they captured it, the grizzly made sure it wasn’t gonna leave hungry.

It jumped in and stole the carcass, taking home a nice meal.

This “rare phenomenon” is known as kleptoparasitism, which is where one animal steals the resources of another animal/pack of animals.

The National Park Service (NPS) weighed in on the rare occurrence:

“This bear seems to have figured out that following the wolves in the morning will increase its chances of encountering a high-calorie meal.”

The NPS also said that wolves will typically yield for bears, because it puts their own safety at risk, knowing that they don’t stand much of a chance against the much larger creatures, and they simply wait their turn.

According to the NPS, it’s a rare occurrence because following a wolf pack around takes a lot of energy for the bear, but can be very rewarding, as an elk carcass is high in protein and fat, which is pivotal for hibernation.

“On the morning of October 21, 2021 visitors watching wildlife in Yellowstone’s northern range were amazed when they saw an adult grizzly bear seemingly hunting elk with the Junction Butte wolf pack. Wolves and bears typically compete with one another for prey, so why might this be happening?

Typically, wolves will yield to incoming bears. Since hunting is dangerous and often unsuccessful, it’s better for wolves to wait their turn at a carcass that has been usurped by a bear than it is for them to continue hunting.

From the bear’s perspective, it takes a lot of energy to follow a wolf pack around, but the reward is high if it successfully takes over a carcass. A fresh elk carcass is a wonderful source of fat and protein for a grizzly bear preparing for hibernation.

This bear seems to have figured out that following the wolves in the morning will increase its chances of encountering a high-calorie meal.”

Ever work on a group project where one dumbass doesn’t do any of the work, but still gets a good grade? This is nature’s version of that…

Minute Out In It – A Grizzly Bear Steals a Wolf Kill

On the morning of October 21, 2021 visitors watching wildlife in Yellowstone’s northern range were amazed when they saw an adult grizzly bear seemingly hunting elk with the Junction Butte wolf pack. Wolves and bears typically compete with one another for prey, so why might this be happening?Typically, wolves will yield to incoming bears. Since hunting is dangerous and often unsuccessful, it’s better for wolves to wait their turn at a carcass that has been usurped by a bear than it is for them to continue hunting (Tallian et al. 2017). From the bear’s perspective, it takes a lot of energy to follow a wolf pack around, but the reward is high if it successfully takes over a carcass. A fresh elk carcass is a wonderful source of fat and protein for a grizzly bear preparing for hibernation. This bear seems to have figured out that following the wolves in the morning will increase its chances of encountering a high-calorie meal. (NPS / Maddy Jackson)

Posted by Yellowstone National Park on Wednesday, December 15, 2021

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